How Much Do You Know About … Salt?


May 22, 2016

saltshaker

Salt is so plentiful in our times that we don’t even think much about it, except to use less of it for medical reasons. It is hard to believe that it was so revered that military battles were fought over it! How much do you know about salt?

 Here is a quiz to test your knowledge about salt!

1. There is an enormous salt mine, 100 years old, under an American city about 1,200 feet below ground. Which city?

A. San Francisco.
B. Seattle.
C. Detroit.

2. Where in the world is there a hotel and spa completely made of salt:

A. Dubai.
B. Bolivia.
C. Myanmar.

3. In the early 1800s salt was four times as expensive

as ____ on the frontier:

A. Fur.
B. Beef.
C. Leather.

4. The word “salary” comes from salt because:

A. Romans were paid money with which they bought salt.
B. Romans were paid in salt.
C. Romans guarded roads which led to salt mines.

5. We eat 7 per cent of all salt production. The other 93 per cent is used by the:

A. Aviation industry.
B. Chemical industry.
C. Transportation industry.

6. The expression “not worth his salt” came from:

A. Greece.
B. India.
C. England.

 Answers:

1. C. There is an enormous salt mine under the city of Detroit, about 1,200 feet below ground. According to Detroit Salt Co., the century-old mine spreads out more than 1,500 acres and
has more than 100 miles of underground roads.

2. B. The Palacio de Sal Hotel and Spa in Bolivia is completely made out of salt.

3. B. In the early 1800s salt was four times as expensive as beef on the frontier – it was essential to keep people and livestock alive.

4. A..and C. There is a very common misconception that Roman soldiers were paid in salt (hence the word Salary), but in fact they were paid in normal money. Because Roman soldiers were given money to buy salt, the word “salary” was coined.However, many believe also that the connection with salt is possibly due to the fact that the soldiers protected the salt roads leading to Rome (Via Salarium).

5. B. We eat 7 per cent of all salt production. The other 93 per cent is used by the chemical
industry.

6. A. “He is not worth his salt” is an expression that originated in ancient Greece where salt was traded for slaves.