100 Years of Texas Art: A Celebration of Stylistic Diversity


June 12, 2017

stout Since the days Texas was settled, artistic activity has been pivotal to Texas cultural life. Yet Texas art has all too often been stereotyped as offering only depictions of cowboys, cattle, and wildflowers. According to art historian and fine art appraiser Sarah Foltz, those subjects only represent a small fraction of the art that Texas offers. In fact, these days Texas art is being recognized by the larger art world as a vibrant center of stylistic diversity. In her upcoming class, “100 Years of Texas Art”, (starting on September 11th at 10 a.m), Foltz takes us on a whirlwind tour exploring the unique and eclectic mix of art works that make up Texas art. We spoke with her to find out more.

WIH Reporter: What do we need to know about your upcoming class?

Foltz: There will be three important exhibitions on Texas Art occurring during the class, and visits will be made to our class by the curators, art historians, and artists involved with these projects. This gives our class an opportunity to hear first-hand information about these projects.

WIH Reporter: Can you describe these exhibitions for us?

Foltz: The first one focuses on two Houston artists cooperatives from the 1930s – the Houston Artists Gallery and the Negro Art Guild—separate-but-parallel groups organized by Houston artists so that they could exhibit and sell their art. The second one celebrates the abstract expressionist paintings and sculptures of Richard Stout, a Houston artist (born in Beaumont, Texas, 1934). Stout is an acknowledged artist with a significant following in Texas who has international accolades. The third exhibition is called “Of Texas Rivers and Texas Art ” showcasing a compilation of some of the finest contemporary river art detailing the gorgeous traits of Texas landscapes.

WIH Reporter: What misconceptions about Texas art have you encountered in your work as an art historian and fine art appraiser?

Foltz:  One common misconception about “Texas Art” is that it is only paintings of cowboys and bluebonnets. While those subjects are a (very) small portion of it, there is a wide range of stylistic diversity, and an embrace of new ideas and media that have evolved over the past 100 years.  

 WIH Reporter: What format do you plan to use in the class.?

Foltz:  As this course covers 100 years of Texas art, this survey-style course will consist of classroom lectures, as well as visits to private collections and exhibitions, which will familiarize participants with the key movements and artists active in the state.  Additional resource references and reading lists will be provided for anyone interesting in delving further into the art history of Texas. 

WIH Reporter: We like to ask what books are on your night table right now?

Foltz:  The books I am reading right now include, “Why the Raven Calls the Canyon” by E Dan Klepper, “Minding the Store” by Stanley Marcus, “Texas Identities” by Light Cummins, and “William Goyen: Collected Short Stories” by William Goyen.

Sarah Foltz’s class, 100 Years of Texas Art, begins on September 11, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. For more information or to register, click here.