Fernando Casas Speaks: On The Politics of Art


June 12, 2017
magi

Adoration of the Magi, El Greco 1568, via Wikipedia

Migration, racism, Islamophobia, religious intolerance, and persecution have come to define our present political circumstances.These also defined the political circum-stances of the Spain in which El Greco, Velazquez and Goya lived. However, unlike the artists of today, these three artists were forced to work for and under the control of authoritarian monarchies.

Nonetheless, these artists are not only admirable for the technical and aesthetic quality of their work but, more importantly, in spite of their repressive and dangerous circumstances, they were able to speak truth to the abuse of power and close-mindedness through their paintings. This is exactly the method used by the best political artist of our times.

How did they do this?

Look at any of their great paintings and what do you see—masterly technique and beauty? Yes.  Images that aptly convey and support the oppressive and close-minded values of their society? No. Indeed, these paintings seem to embody the strict social, political, and religious tenants regulated by the Spanish Inquisition for three centuries.  But this is true only of their superficial look—a protective skin required for the survival of the artist.

Hidden underneath the conventional content of these paintings resides another painting; one far more profound and noble which is, in one form or another, in sharp opposition to the accepted societal norms. In fact, it is the voice and beauty concealed in such paintings that largely exhibits the aesthetic and moral development of humanity.   We ought to look and listen to them.

Fernando Casas’ class, Politics, Religion & Ethnicity: El Greco, Velazquez, Goya, & Picasso, begins September 11th, 2017, at 1:00 p.m. For more information, or to register, click here.

 

Artist/philosopher Fernando Casas is a native of Bolivia. In 1968 he arrived in the USA with a LASPAU scholarship. In 1970 he received his BA in Philosophy from Colorado College graduating Magna Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa and receiving the Hastings Prize for a paper in Philosophy. He continued his studies at Rice University receiving his MA in 1972 and his PhD in Philosophy in 1978.

Casas has exhibited his works of art in numerous group and solo exhibitions in commercial galleries and museums in cities such as Houston, New York City, Los Angeles, Tokyo, Florence, Lima (Peru), La Paz (Bolivia) and Santiago (Chile). In 2003 he was awarded the Premio alla Carriera at the Florence Biennale.

Since the 1980s, Casas has taught and lectured at several universities in South and North America. His longest association is with Rice University where he has taught in Humanities and Philosophy as Distinguished Lecturer for about 20 years.

Among his publications are The Limit of The Visual World (1990), Polar Perspective: A Graphical System for Creating Two-dimensional Images Representing a World of Four Dimensions (1984), and Flat-Sphere Perspective (1983).