Celebrating 100 Years of Auguste Rodin


August 6, 2017
256px-The_Thinker,_Rodin

wikipedia, public commons

In this year, the centennial of Auguste Rodin’s death, Professor Anna Tahinci presents her new art course, “Auguste Rodin and Modern Sculpture“. In this course, students will engage in Rodin’s fascinating artistic career—initially full of rejections, controversies, and scandals, which he managed to transform into international successes.   We interviewed her to find out more.

 

WIH Reporter: What in your opinion makes this a “must take” class at WIH?

Tahinci: Auguste Rodin (1840-1917) was acclaimed as the greatest sculptor since Phidias and Michelangelo, boldly bringing the ancient art of sculpture into the 20th century. We are all familiar with Rodin’s iconic The Thinker, but this is the perfect moment to rediscover Rodin and his contributions to modern sculpture.

WIH Reporter: Since Rodin is your specialty, can you tell us what motivated you to study him?

Tahinci:  I studied Greek archaeology in Athens and when I moved to Paris for my graduate studies I became fascinated by Rodin’s passion for antiquity and decided to explore his oeuvre and contributions. At that moment I discovered the archives of the Musée Rodin in Paris and the rest is history, or I should say Art History! I did my doctorate at the Sorbonne on Auguste Rodin and studied at the Ecole du Louvre, while working at the Musée Rodin and the Musée d’Orsay.

WIH Reporter: Why is Rodin important for us to study?

TahinciRodin is a key figure in the history of sculpture since he is a bridge, a shifting point between academic sculpture of the 19th century and modern sculpture of the 20th century. He had a challenging career and practice, full of rejections, controversies, and scandals, but he always managed to transform those into future opportunities. As a result, he is an inspirational example of resilience.

WIH Reporter: In what ways did Rodin depart from the traditional sculpture of his time?

Tahinci: Rodin deliberately and systematically broke all academic conventions of his time in at least three different ways: in terms of his subject matters (dealing openly with sensuality without the pretext of mythology), of his style (treating fragments as complete and finished artworks), and his materials and techniques (with his endless experimentation with found objects and archaeological artifacts).

WIH Reporter: What is his legacy?

Tahinci: Rodin explored the expressionistic power of forms (including fragments) while remaining faithful to nature and life. He refused to idealize his figures and at the same time he would embrace accidents and the chance factor in his artistic process. He opened the way to entire generations of sculptors in France, Europe, and America.

WIH ReporterWhere can we see a Rodin sculpture in Houston?

Tahinci: The MFAH has an amazing collection of sculptures by Rodin that you can engage with by visiting both the Beck building and the Cullen Sculpture Garden, such as his iconic “Walking Man”, an amazing example of fragmentation that captures mid-stride motion. It also helps to put Rodin in context by studying sculptures by his master Carrier-Belleuse and by his students Bourdelle and Brancusi, also in the MFAH collection. 

WIH Reporter: What books are on your night table right now?

Tahinci: I am currently in Paris conducting research and gathering material. Thus, the exhibition catalogue of the Rodin centennial is what I am reading. I look forward to sharing my discoveries with my students in the fall.

Professor Tahinci’s six-week class begins on September 5th, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. For more information, or to register, click here.