Contemporary Women’s Fiction: Experience, Style, and Themes


August 6, 2017

contempwomenWomen have been writing up a storm in the twenty-first century, sharing ideas, sufferings, and joys with their increasingly diverse audiences. Laura Richardson’s upcoming class, “Contemporary Women’s Fiction,” explores some of these current literary trends in women’s writing, seeking to identify shared threads of experience, style, and thematic approach in a diverse and interesting set of texts from the twenty-first century.

WIH Reporter: What is important to know about your class?

Richardson: Our syllabus is exceptionally contemporary. All of the novels we’ll read were written in the twenty-first century—in fact, half of the syllabus was published as recently as 2013!

WIH Reporter: What mistaken impressions do we have about contemporary women’s literature?

Richardson: That women only write about women! Plenty of the texts we’ll be reading feature strong, often emotionally-complicated male characters. I would love for our class to have a lively conversation about what it means for a woman to write a male character and vice versa, especially in the context of contemporary writing.

WIH Reporter: What would surprise us to know about women’s experiences as reflected in the books you cover?

Richardson: Perhaps how many similarities there are among experiences of women from diverse backgrounds. Being a contemporary woman in a global community means a worldwide kinship with women’s issues. One of our primary objectives in the course will be to identify and celebrate (or commiserate with) these likenesses.

WIH Reporter: Can you tell us about the format of each class…readings, images, the legacy or importance of these women authors?

Richardson: We’ll discuss one novel (or memoir) each class, and three classes will also have “extra-credit” reading that’s meant to enhance or accompany our understanding of the main reading. Class will be broken up into lecture and discussion. I’ll start each day by providing students with biographical information about the author, as well as any important historical context that helps us understand the text. After that, I’ll have a series of questions to pose to students, who are welcome to discuss and/or listen as they feel comfortable.

WIH Reporter: What books are on your night table right now?

Richardson: Too many to list all of them here! I just finished John Barth’s Lost in the Funhouse, which is a short story collectionhilarious and weird. I’m now midway through Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections and have also begun rereading Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Talein anticipation of watching the TV adaptation. I love book recommendations, so when you see me at the WI, please tell me what you’re reading and loving!

Laura Richardson’s class beings on September 6, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. For more information, or to register, click here.