A Broader View: Jewish History in Germany in the Last 200 Years


January 22, 2018

Wikipedia, Synagogue at Nuremberg, c. 1890-1900., destroyed in 1938

If the pinnacle of German achievements in science, the arts, and industry at the end of the 19th and the first decades of the 20th century would not have been possible without the “German Citizens of Jewish faith”, why was Jewish life there destroyed so easily within just twelve years?

To answer this and other compelling questions on this topic, Professor Ursula Muenzel presents a 200-year history of the Jews in Germany in her upcoming class, “Beyond the Holocaust: German Jews From Napoleonic Times To Present Day“. We visited her to find out more.

WIH Reporter: Can you tell us what is important to know about your class?

Muenzel: The rise of Jews in German society and the end of German Jewry unfolded within the short span of one and a half century. In this class, I will cover the whole scope of Jewish-German co-existence.

WIH Reporter: What mistaken impressions do we have about Jews in Germany?

Muenzel: The mistaken impression is to see the history of Jews in Germany only in retrospect, from the Holocaust, which is sometimes in the way of a broader perspective.

WIH Reporter: What would surprise us to know in analyzing German-Jewish history when looking through a broader historical perspective?

Muenzel: What is surprising is the Jews in Germany constituted such a tiny minority. However, they were perceived to have a much larger influence, both in good and malevolent ways.

WIH Reporter: What will be the format of your class?

Muenzel: It will combine several elements: a lecture supported by PowerPoint presentation, suggestions for independent reading and always Q and A. Ideally we will create a dialogue between myself and the students.

WIH Reporter: We like to ask every so often about what books are on on our professors’ night tables right now.

Muenzel: Current books include Die Welt von Gestern (The world of Yesterday), a memoir by Stefan Zweig, an Austrian author, who gained world fame before 1933 and who committed suicide in exile in Brazil in 1942. I just visited his last home which has been converted to a small museum, in Petropolis, Brazil. In addition a small volume of poems Brazilyrik by Nikolaus von Behr, in Portuguese and German.

Professor Muenzel’s 6-week class begins on February 8th at 10:00 a.m. For more information, or to register, click here.